Teaching Clips from A Unique and Valued Profession

Video Teaching Clips from A Unique and Valued Profession:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers are critical to improving the health and wellbeing of their people. They bring unique cultural skills and play a vital role that spans clinical intervention, health promotion, and community outreach and liaison. These teaching clips have been taken from the “A Unique and Valued Profession” Multimedia Project, which was developed to showcase, inform and educate all health professionals on the role and function of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers.

These eight video clips can be incorporated into your teaching material; whether lectures, learning activities or set assignments. The videos are available to view online by clicking the thumbnail image below or order the videos on USB by completing this Online Order Form or emailing support@rhef.com.au.

Copyright and allowed usage
© 2013 Health Workforce Australia

This work is copyright. It may be reproduced in whole or part for study or training purposes. Subject to an
acknowledgement of the source, reproduction for purposes other than those indicated above, or not in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1968, requires the written permission of Health Workforce Australia (HWA).

Warning:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that these videos may contain images and
voices of people who have died.

Description of Teaching Clip videos

1. The role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers have a wide and varied role across primary healthcare, in hospitals and within the community. In this clip we hear about the role and its importance in delivering culturally safe healthcare and improving the health outcomes of Australia’s first peoples.

2. Training and getting started
In this clip we hear about the training involved in becoming an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker; both in an academic setting and during supported hands-on training in practice.

3. Cultural brokerage
Core to the work of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers is being a cultural broker; someone who helps people on both sides of a cultural difference connect with and understand the other. They also help each ‘cross into’ the other culture, whether a non-Indigenous healthcare professional engaging with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person, or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person being treated in a primarily non-Indigenous health facility such as a hospital.

4. Gathering medical, social, family and cultural information
This clip illustrates the ability of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker to gather not only physical and medical data, but also information that is more sensitive and harder to get. Often this is family, social or cultural information that is crucial to the person’s holistic health and well-being.

5. Improving patient communication and understanding
It can be difficult for an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person to communicate with non-Indigenous health professionals, whether due to a language barrier, cultural differences or lack of health literacy. This clip shows how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers can improve patients’ connection with and understanding of the health information and advice they are receiving, and just as importantly support them in asking relevant questions before or during consultations.

6. Health Workers front and centre in a primary healthcare clinic
At Wuchopperen Health Service in Cairns, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers play a central role. In this clip we hear why they are so important, and how they support improved access to health services for the patients and community, and help patients at every stage.

7. Supporting patients during their hospital stay
For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, having to go to hospital means leaving their family and community far behind and going into a strange and sometimes culturally unsafe environment. At a time when people can be at their most vulnerable, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers provide vital support throughout their stay, and essential liaison with other hospital staff.

8. Connecting the community with health services & information
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers play an important role in connecting their community with health services. They go into their community and engage them with health promotion, support ongoing management of chronic disease and create new opportunities for the community to discuss health issues and get health advice in a culturally safe and effective way. Nunga Lunch in Adelaide is a great example of this approach.

Credits

These clips, and the ‘A Unique and Valued Profession’ material, feature real patients, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and non-Indigenous Health Professionals, and the filming depicted real-life clinical situations and consultations. All of these people provided their written permission to be filmed and featured, as required by the Rural Health Education Foundation’s policy.

Our thanks to all those patients, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Practitioners and non-Indigenous Health Professionals who feature in these clips and the original programs. Our thanks also to the individuals and organisations who generously gave of their time and expertise to provide advice and support throughout the project.

This project was produced by the Rural Health Education Foundation, steered by an Advisory Group including representatives from NATSIHWA; NACCHO; ATSIHPB; ATSIHRTONN and Health Workforce Australia.

The teaching clips were created with input from the LIME (Leaders in Indigenous Medical Educators) network.

The project was possible due to funding made available by Health Workforce Australia, an Australian Government Initiative.

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